Last edited by Doukazahn
Wednesday, November 11, 2020 | History

1 edition of Implantable chemotherapy infusion pump for the treatment of liver cancer found in the catalog.

Implantable chemotherapy infusion pump for the treatment of liver cancer

Implantable chemotherapy infusion pump for the treatment of liver cancer

  • 5 Want to read
  • 33 Currently reading

Published by National Center for Health Services Research, U.S. DHHS, PHS, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health, Available from National Technical Information Service in Rockville, Md, Springfield, VA .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Liver Neoplasms -- drug therapy.,
  • Drug Therapy.

  • Edition Notes

    Statement[Enrique D. Carter, Bruce Waxman, and Joel Broida].
    SeriesHealth technology assessment reports -- 1983, no. 19, Health technology assessment reports -- 1983, no. 19, Health technology assessment reports -- 1983, no. 19
    ContributionsCarter, Enrique D., Waxman, Bruce., Broida, Joel., National Center for Health Services Research (U.S.)
    The Physical Object
    Pagination18 p. ;
    Number of Pages18
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14739620M

    CHEMOTHERAPY FOR CANCER The insertion of implantable infusion pumps is considered medically necessary and, therefore, covered for any ofthe following chemotherapy regimens: Intra-arterial infusion of 5-fluorodeoxyuridine (5-FUdR) for the treatment of liver cancer for individuals with primary hepatocellular carcinoma. Implantable infusion pumps for intrahepatic administration of chemotherapy for indications other than noted above, including treatment of hepatic metastases from cancers other than colorectal cancer; or. 2. Implantable pumps for the infusion of heparin for recurrent thromboembolic disease; or 3. I. Implantable Infusion Psump. Aetna considers implanted infusion pumps medically necessary durable medical equipment (DME) when all of the following criteria are met: Itmis edically necessathry at the drug beinisadm tered by an implanted infusion pump; and. The drug is medically necary fess or the treatment of members (see. The fluoropyrimidines 5-FU and FUDR are antimetabolites that have limited activity in the treatment of patients with colorectal metastases. The availability of implantable or portable drug infusion pumps has caused a renewed interest in continuous infusion therapy using these drugs for patients with colorectal metastases to the liver.


Share this book
You might also like
Old Scotch songs & poems.

Old Scotch songs & poems.

EPR studies of monoclinic thulium salts.

EPR studies of monoclinic thulium salts.

little stork told me

little stork told me

Sculptures by Jacob E. Thomas & sons

Sculptures by Jacob E. Thomas & sons

orders of architecture, Greek, Roman and renaissance

orders of architecture, Greek, Roman and renaissance

Marketing 2000, Eleventh Edition And Smith Mgr

Marketing 2000, Eleventh Edition And Smith Mgr

Control & reduction of unsteady pressure loads in separated shock wave turbulent boundary layer interaction

Control & reduction of unsteady pressure loads in separated shock wave turbulent boundary layer interaction

Icelandic sagas

Icelandic sagas

Bingo & The sea

Bingo & The sea

Ion

Ion

Rock Island

Rock Island

A Censure of three scandalous pamphlets

A Censure of three scandalous pamphlets

Committee meeting of Assembly Tourism and Gaming Committee

Committee meeting of Assembly Tourism and Gaming Committee

Direct supervision jails

Direct supervision jails

Multi-age grouping perspectives

Multi-age grouping perspectives

Air Almanac 1994 (Air Almanac)

Air Almanac 1994 (Air Almanac)

Community development programme in India.

Community development programme in India.

Directory of college libraries in Pakistan.

Directory of college libraries in Pakistan.

Implantable chemotherapy infusion pump for the treatment of liver cancer Download PDF EPUB FB2

The fill port is in the center of your pump. Medication is put into your pump through the fill port. The reservoir will hold your medication.; The catheter is a small, flexible tube.

It connects your pump to your hepatic artery (the main blood vessel that goes into your liver). Cancer Vol Issue 5. Article. Free Access. Intra‐arterial chemotherapy using an implantable infusion pump and liver irradiation for the treatment of hepatic metastases.

Robert M. Barone MD, FACS. Corresponding by: C. Balch, M. Urist, Intraarterial Chemotherapy for Colorectal Liver Metastases and Hepatomas Using a Totally Implantable Drug Infusion Pump, Therapeutic Strategies in Primary and Metastatic Liver Cancer, /_30, (), ().Cited by: A prospective Phase II clinical trial of continuous FUDR regional chemotherapy for colorectal metastases to the liver using a totally implantable drug infusion pump.

Ann. Surg. –, PubMed CrossRef Google ScholarAuthor: P. Schneider, P. Sugarbaker, F. Gianola. Robert M. Barone, John E. Byfield, Paul B. Goldfarb, Sallie Frankel, Cindy Ginn and Sherrie Greer, Intra‐arterial chemotherapy using an implantable infusion pump and liver irradiation for the treatment of hepatic metastases, Cancer, 50, 5, (), ().Cited by: This paper describes the use of a totally implantable, percutaneously refillable infusion pump in 5 patients with primary or metastatic carcinoma of the liver.

The infusion cannulae were placed into the hepatic arteries under direct vision at laparotomy, and the pumps were placed in subcutaneous pockets. Had cancer resected or removed from the liver, but are at high risk for developing further liver cancers because microscopic cancer cells likely remain within the liver; Benefits of Intrahepatic Pump Therapy Fewer side effects.

By administering the chemotherapy directly into the liver, we can use a much higher concentration of the chemotherapy. An infuser is a small pump.

It looks like a baby bottle with a balloon inside it. The balloon is filled with chemotherapy. There is a long thin tube coming out of one side. HAI employs a pump about the size and shape of a hockey puck that’s surgically implanted in the abdomen and delivers chemotherapy directly to the liver.

The pump is placed under the skin between the ribs and pelvis. It is then connected to the hepatic artery, which supplies blood to the liver, and especially to liver tumors. To date, hepatic artery infusion (HAI) chemotherapy has primarily been investigated in the setting of colorectal cancer liver metastases (CRLM).

Few studies have been conducted in North America regarding HAI chemotherapy for Implantable chemotherapy infusion pump for the treatment of liver cancer book liver cancers (PLC) or noncolorectal liver metastases (non-CRLM). Despite decades of evaluation, controversy surrounding the use of HAI chemotherapy still.

The editorial was written to highlight an article from Weiss et al 1 utilizing an implantable pump, a technical advance that allowed long-term, relatively safe, hepatic artery infusions (HAI) of chemotherapy for patients with primary or metastatic lesions in the liver.

2,3 Metastatic spread to the liver occurs in 50% to 60% of patients with colorectal cancer, and eventually leads to death.

The manufacturer has announced that the Codman pump, which delivers targeted chemotherapy to the liver, is being discontinued, leaving physicians and patients scrambling for an alternative option.

The implantable infusion pump is covered for intra-arterial infusion of 5-FUdR for the treatment of liver cancer for patients with primary hepatocellular carcinoma or Duke's Class D colorectal cancer, in whom the metastases are limited to the liver, and where: (1) the disease is unresectable, or, (2) the patient refuses surgical excision of the tumor.

A chemotherapy pump, also called a chemo pump or an infusion pump, is a medical device that intravenously injects chemotherapy drugs into the patient's bloodstream at a set rate. These pumps are commonly used in the treatment of cancer, either by themselves or in combination with other cancer treatments such as radiotherapy or surgery.

Hepatic arterial infusion pump (HAIP) chemotherapy using floxuridine for liver tumors is a treatment that has been developed at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC, New York, USA). It is currently not available in the European Union (EU), because floxuridine (FUDR) is not registered in the EU.

address the use of implantable infusion pumps for delivery of chemotherapy for primary liver cancer. Several case series were identified.

Most recently, Jarnagin et al. () reported on 34 patients with unresectable primary liver cancer who received hepatic arterial infusion of floxuridine and. Patients in arm B receive an implantable pump at the time of CRLM resection and start adjuvant HAIP chemotherapy weeks after surgery, with 6 cycles of floxuridine scheduled.

The primary endpoint is progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary endpoints include overall survival, hepatic PFS, safety, quality of life, and cost-effectiveness. Hepatic Artery Chemo-Infusion (HAI) Through Implantable Pump for Colorectal Cancer Liver Metastases.

Cleveland Clinic Liver Tumor Clinic’s Federico Aucejo, MD, discusses how a regional-directed chemotherapy option is providing hope for patients with non-resectable colorectal cancer with liver metastases. Medically Necessary. Implantable infusion pumps are considered medically necessary when used to deliver drugs for the treatment of.

Primary liver cancer (intrahepatic artery injection of chemotherapeutic agents); or Metastatic colorectal cancer where metastases are limited to the liver (intrahepatic artery injection of chemotherapeutic agents); or.

The Model Infusaid implantable, refillable drug infusion pump overcomes much of the discomfort and inconvenience associated with previously employed extracorporeal systems. Our experience with our first 50 patients has been presented herein.

Forty-one patients had metastatic colorectal cancer, 3 primary cancers, and 6 other metastatic cancers.

Implantable Infusion Pumps Chemotherapy for Liver Cancer - The implantable infusion pump is covered for intra - arterial infusion of 5 - FUdR for the treatment of liver cancer for patients with primary hepatocellular carcinoma or Duke's Class D colorectal cancer, in whom the metastases are limited to the liver, and where: (1) the disease is.

Many people with colorectal cancer get liver metastases. Standard treatment for this is a combination of chemotherapy drugs. Directing the chemotherapy to the liver may be effective.

A device that does this a pump that delivers drugs over 2 weeks at constant rate into the hepatic artery. HAI is a procedure in which chemotherapy drugs are directly delivered to the liver through a pump that is surgically implanted into the liver.

This approach can produce higher local concentrations of the infused drug with few systemic side effects. The manufacturer of the main pump device used for HAI terminated production in April   Intrahepatic Chemotherapy Infusion for Liver Metastases from Colorectal Cancer Implantable infusion pumps are considered medically necessary for administration of intrahepatic chemotherapy (e.g., floxuridine) to members with primary hepatocellular carcinoma and for metastatic colorectal cancer where metastases are limited to the liver.

of 10 patients (40%) with unresectable liver cancer treated with intrahepatic chemotherapy delivered through an implantable pump. This evidence is limited but suggests that some patients, with limited alternative treatment options, may benefit from arterial infusion of chemotherapy.

Liver Metastases from Colorectal Cancer. The normal liver gets its blood supply from two sources: the portal vein (about 70%) and the hepatic artery (30%). Primary liver cancer, also known as hepatoma or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) gets its blood exclusively from the hepatic artery.

These techniques can also be used to treat secondary, or metastatic liver cancer, which is cancer that spread to the liver from other primary sites.

National Cancer Institute: “Chemotherapy and You.” The Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania: “Chemotherapy: The Basics.” American Cancer Society: “Questions about. Barone RM, Byfield JE, Boddfarb PB, et al: Intra-arterial chemotherapy using an implantable infusion pump and liver irradiation for treatment of hepatic metastases.

Cancer ; Crossref. patients with unresectable liver cancer treated with intrahepatic chemotherapy delivered through an implantable pump. The evidence is limited but suggests that some patients, with limited other treatment options, may benefit from arterial infusion of chemotherapy.

Liver metastases from colorectal cancer. Implantable infusion pumps can provide long-term drug infusion at constant or variable rates.

FDA approval for this route of access and for the related indication for the treatment of: • Cancer in the following situations: address the use of implantable infusion pumps for delivery of chemotherapy for primary liver cancer.

Several case. Incorporating an implantable chemotherapy infusion pump Along with the new transplant protocol, the Liver Cancer Program incorporated a hepatic artery chemotherapy infusion pump protocol for patients with disease limited to the liver.

Implantable infusion pumps have been used to administer antibiotics (e.g., clindamycin) for the treatment of osteomyelitis in some cases.

However, evidence in the published scientific literature is insufficient and does not support safety and efficacy regarding the use of implantable infusion pumps for the long-term administration of antibiotics.

Anti-inflammatory drugs, such as dexamethasone lower the body’s immune response and are used with other drugs in the treatment of some types of cancer. Using the Medtronic pump and Codman catheter to deliver chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with colorectal cancer or cholangiocarcinoma.

Kemeny N, Cohen A, Bertino JR, Sigurdson ER, Botet J, and Oderman P. Continuous intrahepatic infusion of floxuridine and leucovorin through an implantable pump for the treatment of hepatic metastases from colorectal carcinoma, Cancer, 65 () – For example, implanted infusion pumps are covered when used for the intra-arterial infusion of 5-FudR for the treatment of liver cancer.

The primary diagnosis must be hepatocellular carcinoma or Duke's Class D colorectal cancer where metastases are limited to the liver. apy for treatment of colorectal hepatic metastases has led to renewed interest in hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy.

Forty adult patients underwent preoperative examination, op-erative staging of the extent of liver involvement, and surgical placement of an implantable pump with the catheter in the hepatic arterial system. Twenty-one.

Background: Adjuvant hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) chemotherapy has been demonstrated to improve disease-free survival for colorectal cancer liver metastases. It is unclear if this improvement can be extrapolated to unresectable liver metastases that undergo RFA. The aim of this study was to evaluate the combination of RFA and HAI chemotherapy for unresectable liver metastases.

Implantable infusion pump is a medical device used to deliver the drug to the patients through intra-arterial, intra venous, subcutaneous, intraperitoneal, intrathecal route and epidural. This pump is surgically set in a subcutaneous pocket in the abdominal wall, and a.

Hepatic artery infusion, or chemo given directly into the hepatic artery, is regional chemotherapy that can be used for liver cancer. Hepatic artery infusion Doctors have studied putting chemo drugs directly into the hepatic artery at a constant rate to see if it might be more effective than systemic chemo.

Sixty-two patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma involving the liver were treated by hepatic intra-arterial chemotherapy using an implantable infusion pump.

The 53 patients with metastases confined to the liver had a median survival (MS) of 17 months and an objective response rate of 32%. The Medtronic Synchromed II pump is a surgically implantable device that allows for the delivery of high doses of chemotherapy directly to the liver, in order to treat cancer.

The device is surgically implanted into a subcutaneous pocket in the abdominal wall, and the catheter is inserted into the arterial system of the liver, allowing for.The Hepatic Artery Infusion Pump (HAIP) is a small, disc-shaped device that is surgically implanted just below the skin of the patient, and is connected via a catheter to the hepatic (main) artery of the liver.

About 95 percent of the chemotherapy that is directed through this pump stays in the liver, sparing the rest of the body from side effects.If the indication for the implantable infusion pump is for reasons other than chemotherapy for liver cancer (primary hepatocellular carcinoma or Duke’s Class D colorectal cancer in whom the metastases are limited to the liver), antispasmodic drugs for severe spasticity or opioid drugs for treatment of chronic intractable pain, or the.